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First Successful Flight Happened 119 Years Ago, And It Lasted Just 12 Seconds

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First Successful Flight Happened 119 Years Ago, And It Lasted Just 12 Seconds - autojosh

First successful flight by Wright brothers happened 119 years ago, and it lasted for just 12 seconds. 

The aircraft, piloted by Orville, flew approximately 20 feet (6 metres) above the ground for 120 feet (36 metres).

The final flight of the day piloted by Orville’s brother, Wilbur, traveled an impressive 852 feet in 59 seconds.

The historic biplane is on permanent display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.





First Successful Flight Happened 119 Years Ago, And It Lasted Just 12 Seconds - autojosh

It’s been 119 years since Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first successful flight in history in their gasoline-powered, propeller-driven biplane at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

On the morning of December 17, 1903, Orville piloted the first flight that lasted just 12 seconds. The aircraft flew approximately 20 feet (6 metres) above the ground for 120 feet (36 metres).

First Successful Flight Happened 119 Years Ago, And It Lasted Just 12 Seconds - autojosh

While the first of four flights that day lasted just 12 seconds and traveled only 120 feet, the final flight piloted by Orville’s brother, Wilbur, traveled an impressive 852 feet in 59 seconds.

The Wright brothers, Orville Wright and Wilbur Wright, were American aviation pioneers generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world’s first successful motor-operated airplane.

First Successful Flight Happened 119 Years Ago, And It Lasted Just 12 Seconds - autojosh





The brothers made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft with the Wright Flyer. They were also the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.

The historic gasoline-powered, propeller-driven biplane which the Wright brothers made the first successful flight in in 1903 is on permanent display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.





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