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This $26m Boeing 747 Owned By Televangelist May Never Fly Again Due To Expensive Repair Cost

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This $26m Boeing 747 Owned By Televangelist May Never Fly Again Due To Expensive Repair Cost - autojosh

This $26m Boeing 747 aircraft owned By Televangelist Ernest Angley may never fly again due to expensive repair cost. 

It needs a part necessary for landing that would cost Grace Cathedral six-figures, which the ministry does not have.

The Jet “Star Triple Seven” has been wasting away at the Pinal Airpark in Marana, Arizona, for the last 40 months.

The Airpark in Marana is referred to as a “boneyard” because many of the aircrafts stored there are eventually used for parts and scrapped.





This $26m Boeing 747 Owned By Televangelist May Never Fly Again Due To Expensive Repair Cost - autojosh

This $26m Boeing 747 Owned By Televangelist May Never Fly Again Due To Expensive Repair Cost - autojosh

A $26 million Boeing 747 aircraft owned by a controversial televangelist may never fly again due to high cost of maintenance as well as repair costs.

The luxury aircraft belonged to televangelist Ernest Angley of Grace Cathedral who passed away two months ago at the ripe age of 99.

A Christian post, had in 2019, reported that the then ailing televangelist couldn’t pay to fix the Boeing 747 jet, known as the “Star Triple Seven,” used by his ministry for mission trips.

Sources said the jet will likely not be back in operation because it needs a part necessary for landing that would cost Grace Cathedral six-figures, which the ministry does not have.

This $26m Boeing 747 Owned By Televangelist May Never Fly Again Due To Expensive Repair Cost - autojosh





The aircraft, purchased by Angley’s ministry in 2004 for $26 million, has been wasting away at the Pinal Airpark in Marana, Arizona, for the last 40 months.

Aircrafts parked at Airpark in Marana, Arizona

A source refer to the Airpark in Marana, Arizona as a “boneyard” because many of the aircrafts that are stored there are eventually used for parts and scrapped.

“The value in that plane is parts, and I will tell you even if they parted the whole plane out, I would say you’d be lucky to get a million bucks,”

A journal noted that the jet used by the Angley’s ministry had been costly to maintain. To fill up the 48,000-gallon fuel tank with Grade-A jet fuel reportedly cost the church more than $145,000.

This cost becomes more burdensome for Angley when added to cost such as landing fees, regular maintenance and other incidentals.

The “Star Triple Seven” was operated by American Airlines as a passenger aircraft from the 1980s to the early 1990s. It was later flown as a V.I.P. aircraft by the United Arab Emirates.





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